This Natural Disaster Produces the Fastest Winds on the Planet

(Modern Survival.org) – Natural disasters often strike with little to no warning, altering the lives of anyone unfortunate enough to be caught in their path. From earthquakes and wildfires to hurricanes and tornadoes, these forces of nature can wreak havoc wherever they strike.

For some natural disasters, the brunt of their destructive capabilities come from extremely high winds, such as tornadoes and hurricanes. But which natural disaster has the fastest winds?

That is Fast…

Though hurricanes often produce larger-scale damage than tornadoes do, tornadoes tend to produce faster winds. But how fast do these winds really get in a tornado? The fastest recorded winds occurred on May 3, 1999 near Bridge Creek, Oklahoma. The speed recorded on doppler radar was roughly 301 miles per hour. According to spc.noaa.gov, this was the highest recorded wind speed near the earth’s surface, ever.

Unfortunately, tornadoes tend to form with little to no warning. To make matters worse, they can form at any time, anywhere on the planet. In fact, they have even occurred in the dead of winter and over open water (waterspouts). This is why learning the warning signs of a possible tornado are so important, even for those who don’t live in tornado alley (Texas, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Nebraska and eastern Colorado).

TEST

To see how the signs of an impending tornado can be recognized, check out our article here.

~Here’s to Your Survival!

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